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US6916872: Non-spherical nanopowder derived nanocomposites

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Filing Information

Inventor(s) Tapesh Yadav · Clayton Kostelecky ·
Assignee(s) NanoProducts Corporation ·
Attorney/Agent(s) Stuart T. Langley · Hogan & Hartson LLP ·
Primary Examiner Katarzyna Wyrozebski ·
Application Number US10449282
Filing date 05/30/2003
Issue date 07/12/2005
Prior Publication Data
Predicted expiration date 03/12/2017
Patent term adjustment 190
U.S. Classifications 524/430  · 524/493  · 524/441  · 524/414  · 524/495  · 524/418  · 524/404  ·
International Classifications --
Kind CodeB2
International Classifications 524430 · 524431 · 524432 · 524433 · 524434 · 524435 · 524436 · 524404 · 524413 · 524399 ·
Related U.S. Application DataRELATED APPLICATIONS
This application is a divisional of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/790,036 titled “NANOTECHNOLOGY FOR DRUG DELIVERY, CONTRAST AGENTS AND BIOMEDICAL IMPLANTS” filed on Feb. 20, 2001 which is a divisional of U.S. Ser. No. 09/083,893, now U.S. Pat. No. 6,228,904 filed on May 22, 1998 which is incorporated herein by reference and which claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Applications 60/049,077 filed on Jun. 9, 1997, 60/069,936 filed on Dec. 17, 1997, and 60/079,225 filed on Mar. 24, 1998 and which is a continuation-in-part of copending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 08/739,257, filed Oct. 30, 1996, now U.S. Pat. No. 5,905,000, titled NANOSTRUCTURED ION CONDUCTING SOLID ELECTROLYTES, which is a continuation-in-part of U.S. Ser. No. 08/730,661, filed Oct. 11, 1996, now U.S. Pat. No. 5,952,040 titled “PASSIVE ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS FROM NANOPRECISION ENGINEERED MATERIALS” which is a continuation-in-part of U.S. Ser. No. 08/706,819, filed Sep. 3, 1996, now U.S. Pat. No. 5,851,507 titled “INTEGRATED THERMAL PROCESS FOR THE CONTINUOUS SYNTHESIS OF NANOSCALE POWDERS” and U.S. Ser. No. 08/707,341, filed Sep. 3, 1996, now U.S. Pat. No. 5,788,738 titled “METHOD OF PRODUCING NANOSCALE POWDERS BY QUENCHING OF VAPORS”.
26 Claims, 2 Drawings


Abstract

Nanocomposites from nanofillers with preferred form of whiskers, rods, plates and fibers are disclosed. The matrix composition described includes polymers, ceramics and metals. The composition disclosed include inorganic, organic and metallic. These nanocomposites are useful in wide range of applications given their unusual properties such as refractive index, transparency to light, reflection characteristics, resistivity, permittivity, permeability, coercivity, B-H product, magnetic hysteresis, breakdown voltage, skin depth, curie temperature, dissipation factor, work function, band gap, electromagnetic shielding effectiveness, radiation hardness, chemical reactivity, thermal conductivity, temperature coefficient of an electrical property, voltage coefficient of an electrical property, thermal shock resistance, biocompatibility, and wear rate.

Independent Claims | See all claims (26)

  1. 1. A nanocomposite comprising: a matrix; inorganic nanofillers in the form of whiskers; wherein the nanofillers have a composition comprising of two or more elements and a domain size less than 100 nanometers; wherein the inorganic nanofillers are mixed into the matrix at a loading less than 80 percent by volume to form a nanocomposite; wherein the nanocomposite exhibits a material property that differs by more than 20% as compared with the material property exhibited by a composite of similar composition with fillers having a domain size of at least one micron; and wherein the material property is selected from the group consisting of: refractive index, transparency to light, reflection characteristics, resistivity, permittivity, permeability, coercivity, B-H product, magnetic hysteresis, breakdown voltage, skin depth, curie temperature, dissipation factor, work function, band gap, electromagnetic shielding effectiveness, radiation hardness, chemical reactivity, thermal conductivity, temperature coefficient of an electrical property, voltage coefficient of an electrical property, thermal shock resistance, biocompatibility, and wear rate.
  2. 10. A nanocomposite comprising: a polymer matrix; inorganic nanofillers in the form of whiskers; wherein the nanofillers have a composition comprising of two or more elements; the inorganic nanofillers are mixed into the polymer matrix at a loading less than 80 percent by volume to form a nanocomposite; wherein the nanocomposite exhibits a material property that differs by more than 20% as compared with the material property exhibited by a composite of similar composition with fillers having a domain size of at least one micron; and wherein the material property is selected from the group consisting of: refractive index, transparency to light, reflection characteristics, resistivity, permittivity, permeability, coercivity, B-H product, magnetic hysteresis, breakdown voltage, skin depth, curie temperature, dissipation factor, work function, band gap, electromagnetic shielding effectiveness, radiation hardness, chemical reactivity, thermal conductivity, temperature coefficient of an electrical property, voltage coefficient of an electrical property, thermal shock resistance, biocompatibility, and wear rate.
  3. 11. A nanocomposite comprising: a metal matrix; inorganic nanofillers in the form of whiskers; the inorganic nanofillers are mixed into the metal matrix at a loading less than 80 percent by volume to form a nanocomposite; wherein the nanocomposite exhibits a material property that differs by more than 20% as compared with the material property exhibited by a composite of similar composition with fillers having a domain size of at least one micron; and wherein the material property is selected from the group consisting of: refractive index, transparency to light, reflection characteristics, resistivity, permittivity, permeability, coercivity, B-H product, magnetic hysteresis, breakdown voltage, skin depth, curie temperature, dissipation factor, work function, band gap, electromagnetic shielding effectiveness, radiation hardness, chemical reactivity, thermal conductivity, temperature coefficient of an electrical property, voltage coefficient of an electrical property, thermal shock resistance, biocompatibility, and wear rate.
  4. 12. A nanocomposite comprising: a matrix; inorganic nanofillers in the form of fibers; wherein the nanofillers have a composition comprising of two or more elements and a domain size less than 100 nanometers; wherein the inorganic nanofillers are mixed into the matrix at a loading less than 80 percent by volume to form a nanocomposite; wherein the nanocomposite exhibits a material property that differs by more than 20% as compared with the material property exhibited by a composite of similar composition with fillers having a domain size of at least one micron; and wherein the material property is selected from the group consisting of: refractive index, transparency to light, reflection characteristics, resistivity, permittivity, permeability, coercivity, B-H product, magnetic hysteresis, breakdown voltage, skin depth, curie temperature, dissipation factor, work function, band gap, electromagnetic shielding effectiveness, radiation hardness, chemical reactivity, thermal conductivity, temperature coefficient of an electrical property, voltage coefficient of an electrical property, thermal shock resistance, biocompatibility, and wear rate.
  5. 16. A nanocomposite comprising: a metal matrix; inorganic nanofillers in the form of fibers; wherein the nanofillers have a composition comprising of two or more elements; wherein the inorganic nanofillers are mixed into the metal matrix at a loading less than 80 percent by volume to form a nanocomposite; wherein the nanocomposite exhibits a material property that differs by more than 20% as compared with the material property exhibited by a composite of similar composition with fillers having a domain size of at least one micron; and wherein the material property is selected from the group consisting of: refractive index, transparency to light, reflection characteristics, resistivity, permittivity, permeability, coercivity, B-H product, magnetic hysteresis, breakdown voltage, skin depth curie temperature, dissipation factor, work function, band gap, electromagnetic shielding effectiveness, radiation hardness, chemical reactivity, thermal conductivity, temperature coefficient of an electrical property, voltage coefficient of an electrical property, thermal shock resistance, biocompatibility, and wear rate.
  6. 17. A nanocomposite comprising: a matrix; uncoated inorganic nanofillers in the form of plates; wherein the nanofillers have a domain size less than 100 nanometers; the inorganic nanofillers are mixed into the matrix at a loading less than 80 percent by volume to form a nanocomposite; wherein the nanocomposite exhibits a material property that differs by more than 20% as compared with the material property exhibited by a composite of similar composition with fillers having a domain size of at least one micron; and wherein the material property is selected from the group consisting of: refractive index, transparency to light, reflection characteristics, resistivity, permittivity, permeability, coercivity, B-H product, magnetic hysteresis, breakdown voltage, skin depth, curie temperature, dissipation factor, work function, band gap, electromagnetic shielding effectiveness, radiation hardness, chemical reactivity, thermal conductivity, temperature coefficient of an electrical property, voltage coefficient of an electrical property, thermal shock resistance, biocompatibility, and wear rate.
  7. 20. A nanocomposite comprising: a metal matrix; inorganic nanofillers in the form of plates; the inorganic nanofillers are mixed into the metal matrix at a loading less than 80 percent by volume to form a nanocomposite; wherein the nanocomposite exhibits a material property that differs by more than 20% as compared with the material property exhibited by a composite of similar composition with fillers having a domain size of at least one micron; and wherein the material property is selected from the group consisting of: refractive Index, transparency to light reflection characteristics, resistivity, permittivity, permeability, coercivity, B-H product, magnetic hysteresis, breakdown voltage, skin depth, curie temperature, dissipation factor, work function, band gap, electromagnetic shielding effectiveness, radiation hardness, chemical reactivity, thermal conductivity, temperature coefficient of an electrical property, voltage coefficient of an electrical property, thermal shock resistance, biocompatibility, and wear rate.
  8. 21. A nanocomposite comprising: a matrix; organic nanofillers comprising a form selected from the group consisting of: whiskers, fibers and plates; wherein the nanofillers have a domain size less than 100 nanometers; wherein the organic nanofillers are mixed into the matrix at a loading less than 80 percent by volume to form a nanocomposite; wherein the nanocomposite exhibits a material property that differs by more than 20% as compared with the material property exhibited by a composite of similar composition with fillers having a domain size of at least one micron; and wherein the material property is selected from the group consisting of: refractive index, transparency to light, reflection characteristics, resistivity, permittivity, permeability, coercivity, B-H product, magnetic hysteresis, breakdown voltage, skin depth, curie temperature, dissipation factor, work function, band gap, electromagnetic shielding effectiveness, radiation hardness, chemical reactivity, thermal conductivity, temperature coefficient of an electrical property, voltage coefficient of an electrical property, thermal shock resistance, biocompatibility, and wear rate.
  9. 23. A nanocomposite comprising: a matrix; metallic nanofillers comprising a form selected from the group consisting of whiskers, fibers and plates; wherein the nanofillers have a domain size less than 100 nanometers; wherein the metallic nanofillers are mixed into the matrix at a loading less than 80 percent by volume to form a nanocomposite; wherein the nanocomposite exhibits a material property that differs by more than 20% as compared with the material property exhibited by a composite of similar composition with fillers having a domain size of at least one micron; and wherein the material property is selected from the group consisting of: refractive index, transparency to light, reflection characteristics, resistivity, permittivity, permeability, coercivity, B-H product, magnetic hysteresis, breakdown voltage, skin depth, curie temperature, dissipation factor, work function, band gap, electromagnetic shielding effectiveness, radiation hardness, chemical reactivity, thermal conductivity, temperature coefficient of an electrical property, voltage coefficient of an electrical property, thermal shock resistance, biocompatibility, and wear rate.
  10. 26. A nanocomposite comprising: a matrix; nanofillers comprising a composition of two or more elements from the periodic table; wherein at least one of the two or more elements is selected from the group consisting of aluminum, antimony, boron, bromine, carbon, chlorine, fluorine, germanium, hydrogen, indium, iodine, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus, selenium, silicon, sulfur, or tellurium; wherein nanofillers comprise fillers with an aspect ratio greater than one; wherein the nanofillers are mixed into the matrix at a loading less than 80 percent by volume to form a nanocomposite; wherein the nanocomposite exhibits a material property that differs by more than 20% as compared with the material property exhibited by a composite of similar composition with fillers having a domain size of at least one micron; and wherein the material property is selected from the group consisting of: refractive index, transparency to light, reflection characteristics, resistivity, permittivity, permeability, coercivity, B-H product, magnetic hysteresis, breakdown voltage, skin depth, curie temperature, dissipation factor, work function, band gap, electromagnetic shielding effectiveness, radiation hardness, chemical reactivity, thermal conductivity, temperature coefficient of an electrical property, voltage coefficient of an electrical property, thermal shock resistance, biocompatibility, and wear rate.

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Referenced By

Document NumberAssigneeInventorsIssue/Pub Date
US7183337 NanoProducts Corporation Tapesh Yadav et al. Feb 2007
US7388042 PPG Industries Ohio, Inc. Tapesh Yadav et al. Jun 2008
US7238734 NanoProducts Corporation Tapesh Yadav et al. Jul 2007
US7341757 NanoProducts Corporation Tapesh Yadav Mar 2008
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US7905942 SDCmaterials, Inc. Fredrick P. Layman Mar 2011
US7897127 SDCmaterials, Inc. Frederick P. Layman et al. Mar 2011
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US7708974 PPG Industries Ohio, Inc. Tapesh Yadav May 2010
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US7717001 SDC Materials, Inc. David Richard Pesiri May 2010
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Patent Family

Document NumberAssigneeInventorsIssue/Pub Date
US20030207978 Clayton Kostelecky et al. Nov 2003
US6916872 NanoProducts Corporation Tapesh Yadav et al. Jul 2005