Apparatus and method for generating high voltages using a voltage inversion generator and multiple closed-path ferrites


BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIGURES

The invention can be better understood with reference to the following drawings. The elements of the drawings are not necessarily to scale relative to each other, emphasis instead being placed upon clearly illustrating the principles of the invention. Furthermore, like reference numerals designate corresponding parts throughout the figures.

FIG. 1A, 1B illustrate a conventional vector inversion generator as the generator is being charged by a supply voltage.

FIG. 2 illustrates the conventional spiral vector inversion generator of FIG. 1 in an output mode of operation and shows a switch for connecting a load to a high-voltage output port.

FIG. 3 is an initial state equivalent circuit representing the conventional vector inversion generator of FIG. 1 and FIG. 2 and the ferrite vector inversion generator of the present invention.

FIG. 4 illustrates an equivalent circuit that may represent the conventional spiral vector inversion generator of FIG. 1 and FIG. 2 or the ferrite vector inversion generator when in a fully erected state, is shorted with an output switch and connected to a parallel load such as an antenna or a radiating structure.

FIG. 5A, 5B, 5C, and 5D illustrate an exemplary placement of closed-path ferrites about the layers of conductors and insulators of the vector inversion generator of FIG. 1 and FIG. 2.

FIG. 6 is an illustration comparing the performance of the conventional vector inversion generator of FIG. 1 with the ferrite vector inversion generator of FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 illustrates the effects of adding closed-path ferrites to a conventional vector inversion generator has on the low-frequency circuit and high-frequency circuit shown in FIG. 3.

FIG. 8 graphically illustrates the frequency ratios as a function of the number of ferrites as shown in FIG. 7.

FIG. 9 illustrates how the length of leads at the high-voltage port may be used to modify the high-frequency output of the vector inversion generator of FIG. 2 or FIG. 5 when either is used as an oscillator.

FIG. 10 illustrates variations in efficiency as a function of the ratio of two way transit time to the shorting switch e-folding time for the vector inversion generator of FIG. 2 or ferrite VIG of FIG. 5.

FIG. 11 is a table illustrating examples of switches that may be used for providing the short circuit shown in FIG. 2 or FIG. 5.

FIG. 12 is a table illustrating examples of dielectric materials that may be used for insulation layers for the spiral generators of FIG. 1 and FIG. 5.

FIG. 13A, B is an illustration of a conventional vector inversion generator showing a cross section of the generator of FIG. 1.

FIG. 14A, B is an illustration of a ferrite vector inversion generator in accordance with an exemplary embodiment of the present invention and shown in FIG. 5.

FIG. 15A, B is an illustration of a substantially planar vector inversion generator and a cross section of the planar vector inversion generator in accordance with an exemplary embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 16A, B is an illustration of a ferrite planar vector inversion generator in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 17 is an exemplary method of operation for the ferrite vector inversion generators of FIGS. 14 and 16 in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 18 is a block diagram illustrating the planar vector inversion generator of FIGS. 14 and 16 in accordance with an exemplary embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 19 is a block diagram of a portable X-ray device having power supplied by the ferrite planar vector generator of FIG. 16 in accordance with an exemplary embodiment of the present invention.