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US7481830: Spinal correction system

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Filing Information

Inventor(s) Eric J. Wall · Donita I. Bylski-Austrow ·
Assignee(s) Children's Hospital Medical Center ·
Attorney/Agent(s) Baker & Daniels LLP ·
Primary Examiner Eduardo C Robert ·
Assistant Examiner Jerry Cumberledge ·
Application Number US10862660
Filing date 06/07/2004
Issue date 01/27/2009
Prior Publication Data
Predicted expiration date 02/17/2022
Patent term adjustment 591
U.S. Classifications 606/297  · 606/286  · 606/75  ·
International Classifications A61B1780  ·
Kind CodeB2
Related U.S. Application DataCROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
This application is a continuation of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/030,440, filed Jan. 7, 2002, now U.S. Pat. No. 6,746,450 which is the national phase under 35 U.S.C. § 371 of PCT International Application No. PCT/US00/18491, having a filing date of Jul. 6, 2000, which claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/142,707, filed Jul. 7, 1999, all of which are expressly incorporated by reference herein.
32 Claims, 11 Drawings


Abstract

A spinal correction system for the correction or arrest of scoliosis or spinal deformity in immature spines includes a bridge member, a pair of spaced apart barbed legs extending substantially perpendicularly therefrom, and a fastener retaining portion extending substantially longitudinally from each end of the bridge member. The fastener retaining portions are adapted to lie in adjoining relationship when two or more spinal correction systems are arranged in end-to-end abutting relationship. The spinal correction system is intended to correct or arrest scoliosis in a growing spine by spanning the endplate growth centers of adjacent vertebrae, on the convex side of the malformed spine, to retard growth of that side of the spine while permitting unrestrained growth of the concave side of the spine.

Independent Claims | See all claims (32)

  1. 1. A spinal correction system comprising: a bridge member having an upper surface, an opposed lower surface, a front side, an opposed back side, a left end, and an opposed right end, said bridge member defining a central longitudinal axis extending between said left end and said right end; a left fastener retaining portion extending from said bridge member left end and being laterally offset relative to said longitudinal axis, said left fastener retaining portion having an upper surface, a lower surface, a front side, and a back side; a right fastener retaining portion extending from said bridge member right end and being laterally offset relative to said longitudinal axis, said right fastener retaining portion having an upper surface, a lower surface, a front side, and a back side; a left leg extending downwardly from said bridge member lower surface proximate said left end of said bridge member and inwardly from said left fastener retaining portion, said left leg including a tapered distal free end defining a blade edge for insertion into bone; a right leg extending downwardly from said bridge member lower surface proximate said right end of said bridge member and inwardly from said right fastener retaining portion, said right leg including a tapered distal free end defining a blade edge for insertion into bone, said distal free ends of said right leg and said left leg being positioned in longitudinally spaced relation; and wherein each of said fastener retaining portions are proportioned so that when one of said left and right ends of a first spinal correction system is positioned adjacent one of said right and left ends of a second spinal correction system, with the longitudinal axis of the first spinal correction system being substantially aligned with the longitudinal axis of the second spinal correction system, thereby defining a pair of adjacent ends, each of said fastener retaining portions extending from said adjacent ends is positioned asymmetrical to said longitudinal axis with one of said sides facing one of said sides of the other said fastener retaining portion extending from the other said adjacent end.
  2. 13. A spinal correction system for a spine including longitudinally aligned vertebrae, the vertebrae having confronting endplate growth centers with predetermined thicknesses, a longitudinally extending span defined between the confronting endplate growth center thicknesses, and an intervening disk positioned intermediate the endplate growth centers, the vertebrae having predetermined transverse diameters, said system comprising: a bridge member having an upper surface, an opposed lower surface, a front side, an opposed back side, a left end, and an opposed right end, the length of said bridge member from said left end to said right end being substantially equal to the longitudinally extending span, said lower surface of said bridge member extending upwardly intermediate said left end and said right end and positioned in spaced relation to, and uncoupled from, the longitudinally extending span; a left fastener retaining portion extending from said bridge member left end, said left fastener retaining portion having front and back sides; a right fastener retaining portion extending from said bridge member right end, said right fastener retaining portion having front and back sides; a left leg extending downwardly from said bridge member lower surface proximate said left end of said bridge member and inwardly from said left fastener retaining portion, said left leg including a tapered distal free end defining a blade edge for insertion into a first vertebra; and a right leg extending downwardly from said bridge member lower surface proximate said right end of said bridge member and inwardly from said right fastener retaining portion, said right leg including a tapered distal free end defining a blade edge for insertion into a second vertebra, said distal free end of said right leg being positioned in longitudinally spaced relation to said distal free end of said left leg.
  3. 18. A spinal staple comprising: a bridge member having an upper surface, an opposed lower surface, a front side, an opposed back side, a left end, and an opposed right end; a left fastener retaining portion extending from said bridge member left end and including a lower surface and a passageway configured to receive a fastener; a right fastener retaining portion extending from said bridge member right end and including a lower surface and a passageway configured to receive a fastener; a left leg extending downwardly relative to said lower surface of said bridge member proximate said left end and inboard of said left fastener retaining portion said left leg including a tapered tip defining a blade edge for insertion into a first vertebra, said left leg further including an outer surface, an opposed inner surface, a front surface, an opposed back surface, a width measured from said front surface to said back surface, and a thickness measured from said outer surface to said inner surface, said width being substantially greater than said thickness; and a right leg extending downwardly relative to said lower surface of said bridge member proximate said right end and inboard of said left fastener retaining portion said right leg including a tapered tip defining a blade edge for insertion into a second vertebra, said right leg further including an outer surface, an opposed inner surface, a front surface, and an opposed back surface, a width measured from said front surface to said back surface, and a thickness measured from said outer surface to said inner surface, said width being substantially greater than said thickness.
  4. 20. The spinal staple of claim19, further comprising an attachment member coupled to said bridge member and configured to facilitate attachment of a removable cannulated impact device, said passageway extending through said attachment member.
  5. 24. A spinal staple comprising: a bridge member having an upper surface, an opposed lower surface, a front side, an opposed back side, a left end, and an opposed right end; a left fastener retaining portion extending from said bridge member left end and including a lower surface and a passageway; a left fastener extending within said passageway of said left fastener retaining portion and configured to be inserted into a first vertebra; a left leg extending downwardly from the lower surface of the bridge member proximate the left end and inboard of the left fastener retaining portion for insertion into a first vertebra; a right fastener retaining portion extending from said bridge member right end and including a lower surface and a passageway; a right fastener extending within said passageway of said right fastener retaining portion and configured to be inserted into a second vertebra; a right leg extending downwardly from the lower surface of the bridge member proximate the right end and inboard of the right fastener retaining portion for insertion into a second vertebra; a plurality of first projections each having a first length and extending downwardly from one of said left fastener retaining portion and said right fastener retaining portion; and a plurality of second projections each having a second length and extending downwardly from one of said lower surface of said left fastener retaining portion and said right fastener retaining portion, each of said second projections being positioned further from said bridge member than each of said first projections, and said second length being greater than said first length.
  6. 25. A spinal staple comprising: a bridge member having an upper surface, an opposed lower surface, a front side, an opposed back side, a left end, and an opposed right end, said bridge member defining a longitudinal axis extending from said left end to said right end; a left fastener retaining portion extending from said bridge member left end; a left fastener extending within said left fastener retaining portion and configured to be inserted into a first vertebra; a right fastener retaining portion extending from said bridge member right end; a right fastener extending within said right fastener retaining portion and configured to be inserted into a second vertebra; a left leg extending from said lower surface of said bridge member proximate said left end and inboard of said left fastener retaining portion for insertion into the first vertebra, said left leg including an outer surface, an opposed inner surface, a front surface, and an opposed back surface, said inner surface angled relative to said outer surface and extending from proximate said front side to proximate said back side of said bridge member such that said left leg and said bridge member have substantially equal widths; and a right leg extending from said lower surface of said bridge member proximate said right end and configured to be inserted into the second vertebra, said left leg including an outer surface, an opposed inner surface, a front surface, and an opposed back surface, said inner surface angled relative to said outer surface and extending from proximate said front side to proximate said back side of said bridge member such that said right leg and said bridge member have substantially equal widths.

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