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US7754201: Method of vaccination through serotype rotation

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Filing Information

Inventor(s) Danher Wang · Jianyun Dong ·
Assignee(s) GenPhar, Inc ·
Attorney/Agent(s) Benjamin Aaron Adler ·
Primary Examiner Robert Mondesi ·
Assistant Examiner Bao Qun Li ·
Application Number US10286332
Filing date 11/01/2002
Issue date 07/13/2010
Prior Publication Data
Predicted expiration date 09/16/2021
Patent term adjustment 471
U.S. Classifications 424/931  · 424/851  · 424/225.1  · 435/320.1  · 424/228.1  ·
International Classifications A61K6700  · C12N1500  ·
Kind CodeB2
Related U.S. Application DataRELATIONSHIP TO PARENT AND CO-PENDING APPLICATIONS
This application is a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application entitled “GENETIC VACCINE AGAINST HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS”, application Ser. No. 10/003,035, Filed: Nov. 1, 2001, now abandoned which is a continuation-in-part of PCT application entitled “GENETIC VACCINE THAT MIMICS NATURAL VIRAL INFECTION AND INDUCES LONG-LASTING IMMUNITY TO PATHOGEN”, application Ser. No.: PCT US01/18238, Filed: Jun. 4, 2001, which is a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application entitled “GENETIC VACCINE THAT MIMICS NATURAL VIRAL INFECTION AND INDUCES LONG-LASTING IMMUNITY TO PATHOGEN”, application Ser. No. 09/585,599, Filed: Jun. 2, 2000 now U.S. Pat. No. 6,544,780. The above applications are incorporated herein by reference.
18 Claims, 97 Drawings


Abstract

The present invention discloses recombinant adenovirus and methods of administration of the virus to a host inorder to elicit an immune response against various pathogens in the host. Specifically, a vaccination method to enhance immunity of the host to the pathogen is disclosed herein. Such a method comprises recombinant adenoviruses expressing viral antigens, where the recombinant adenoviruses are derived from different serotypes or subtypes. Alternatively, the adenoviruses in such a method can also be constructed by modifying the backbone of one of the adenoviruses (e.g. the knob, shaft or fiber regions) so that it is of a serotype that is different from the corresponding region(s) in the backbone of the other recombinant adenovirus.

Independent Claims | See all claims (18)

  1. 1. A method for producing an immune response of a host to infection of a first and a second pathogenic virus, comprising: administering to the host a first recombinant adenovirus comprising a first antigen sequence heterologous to native adenovirus and encoding a first viral antigen from the first pathogenic virus, expression of the first viral antigen by the first recombinant adenovirus eliciting an immune response directed against the first viral antigen in a host upon infection of the host by the first recombinant adenovirus; administering to the host a second recombinant adenovirus comprising a second antigen sequence heterologous to native adenovirus and encoding a second viral antigen from the second pathogenic virus, expression of the second viral antigen by the second recombinant adenovirus eliciting an immune response directed against the second viral antigen in a host upon infection of the host by the second recombinant adenovirus, wherein adenoviral backbones of the first and the second recombinant adenoviruses are of the same serotype selected from the group consisting of adenovirus serotype 1-51, wherein either an entire or a part of the fiber region comprising either one of knob, shaft, penton base domain of the fiber region or a combination thereof, of the second recombinant adenovirus is of a serotype that is different from the serotype of fiber region of the first recombinant adenovirus and wherein the first or second recombinant adenovirus further comprises an immuno-stimulator sequence that is heterologous to native adenovirus and encodes an immuno-stimulator such that the immune response elicited by the first and second recombinant adenovirus generates an antibody directed against the first viral antigen, the second viral antigen or a combination thereof wherein the first and the second pathogenic viral antigen are inserted into E1, E3 or E4 region of the first and the second adenovirus vectors, and wherein the immune-stimulatory sequence is inserted into E4, E3 or E1 region of the first and the second adenovirus vectors, in which region does not contain the first and/or the second pathogenic virus antigen; isolating the antibody generated after said administration of the first and the second recombinant adenovirus; and administering the antibody to the host or to another host, thereby producing the immune response of the host to infection of the first and the second pathogenic virus.

References Cited

U.S. Patent Documents

Document NumberAssigneesInventorsIssue/Pub Date
US5866131 Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Ramshaw et al. Feb 1999
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* cited by examiner

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